How to Improve Your Learning Skills and Habits 

Posted on - in Personal Growth

Human beings have an inherent need for growth. Acquiring new skills indicates you have the type of forward-thinking mindset employers covet. Plus, you develop your sense of pride when you master new things.

How to improve learning skills if you’ve been out of school for a while? Easily! All you need to do is jump in with both feet first. The wonders of technology and public services make it possible for you to develop a growth mindset, no matter your age or income level.

1. Sign Up for an Online Course

You don’t have to enroll in a pricey degree program to become a lifelong learner. The miracle of the internet makes it possible for you to find several inexpensive courses on everything from coding to animal reiki therapy. Some are priced lower than $20 a piece. At that price, you can afford to follow your passion.

You can even find college courses online for free, although you won’t get credit. At least seven elite universities offer free online courses, although you don’t earn credit in most cases. Wikipedia also has an online learning platform that you can access for free.

2. Expand Your Language Skills

Did you know that you can stave off your risk of dementia by learning a foreign language? Multi-language people are better able to focus on specific memories, and mastering French could decrease mental fog.

In a global economy, learning a foreign language also improves your chances on the job market. Arabic is in particularly high demand, so if you have an ear for inflection, why not master the skill?

3. Move Your Body in New Ways

Exercise doesn’t only strengthen your heart — it improves your brain function, too! Researchers found that working out creates new neural cells in your hippocampus, the area of the brain concerned with learning and memory. By working up a sweat, you’re improving your ability to concentrate and focus even outside of the gym! You might not think pumping iron deserves a place on how to improve your learning skills list, but it does.

4. Practice an Instrument

Maybe you have an upright piano in your living room that’s gathering dust. Perhaps you have an old keyboard you always meant to learn to play. You can hone your skills with Pianu, an interactive piano teacher that lets you hook your keyboard to your computer and hone your skills.

Maybe guitar or drums are more your jam? Hit some yard sales for instruments you can restore this weekend and get creative!

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5. Join a Community Club

Do you want to make new friends while learning a valuable skill? Why not join a community club at the local recreation center? You can find others who share your passion while living your joy. If you’re athletic, sign up for an intramural sports league and finally master the finer rules of lacrosse. If you prefer artistic pursuits, take a pottery class and recreate the iconic scene from Ghost. 

6. Get Creative in the Kitchen

Weekend (or day off) meal prepping is a wonderful way to save money and time — and shed unwanted pounds. Why? This practice forces you to craft meals more mindfully than you would when you rush around during the workweek. You pay attention to blending appealing flavors and improving nutrient content.

7. Read

Finally, if you want to know how to improve your learning skills, there’s no better way than picking up a book. It doesn’t matter if you lose yourself in the latest Grisham novel or delve into a psychology textbook. As long as you’re engaging with the words on the page, you’re flexing your mental muscle. Literacy matters in all life activities — even reading signs to cross streets safely.

Improve Your Learning Skills and Habits With These Tips

You can master how to improve your learning skills, no matter what your age or socioeconomic status. Use these tips to get that cerebrum exercising today!

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Kayla Matthews writes Productivity Theory and is constantly seeking to provide new tips and hacks to keep you motivated and inspired! You can also find her on Huffington Post and Tiny Buddha, and follow her on Google+ and Twitter to stay up to date on her latest productivity posts!

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